How Botox injections may eventually help your waistline

Botox may be one of the best-known non-invasive cosmetic treatments on the market. Even individuals who have never considered a nip and tuck are no doubt familiar with its ability to smooth wrinkles and reduce laugh lines – even if they immediately think of its overuse. However, various studies have shown that the applications of Botox injections don't stop there. Research has indicated that Botox may ease the pain of migraines, treat excessive sweating and counter involuntary facial ticks associated with Bell's Palsy, among other concerns.

Now, scientists have discovered another potential benefit of Botox that is a bit more closely related to its original application. ScienceDaily reports that a team of Norwegian researchers used an animal model to find out if this injectable can be used to paralyze certain stomach muscles to help people feel fuller for an extended period of time. They ultimately found that injecting Botox into the stomach's vagus nerve could slow down the passage of food through the intestines and prevent rats from feeling the need to eat again.

"As a start, we will be inviting patients who are candidates for obesity operations but who, for one reason or another, cannot undergo one," said lead author Helene Johannessen of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in a press release.

Though this study focused on the ability of Botox to supplement medical weight loss treatments for the morbidly obese, this discovery may eventually influence how Miami plastic surgeons and physicians approach weight loss procedures.

In the meantime, if you are considering Botox injections or other dermal fillers for more conventional applications, contact board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Christopher Craft today to discuss your options.

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